Down the Drain, the Story of Urban Water

The second lecture focuses on stormwater runoff.

Students examine how human development degrades their Accotink Creek Watershed and eventually the Chesapeake Bay.   By taking a close look at the school’s footprint, students are able to analyze the impact their 40 acre campus actually has on Accotink Creek.

Non-point source pollution becomes a major topic as students consider contaminants coming from parking lots and roads.  The sheer volume of runoff is daunting.  In an average rain event, 887,951 gallons of stormwater drain from Fairfax High School.

Lands and Waters presenters, David Alford and Chethan Kenkeremath, lead students on waters journey.  Jeanette Stewart, President of Lands and Waters joins in the discussion.

Lands and Waters presenters, David Alford and Chethan Kenkeremath, lead students on water’s journey. Jeanette Stewart, President of Lands and Waters, joins in the discussion.

Taking a closer look at the school grounds.  63% of the campus are impervious.

Taking a closer look at the school grounds, 63% of the campus is impervious.

That leads only 37% pervious and available to absorb rainwater.

Only 37% of the campus is pervious and able to absorb rainwater.  No wonder there is so much stormwater runoff.

 

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